Parsnips

 

Our parsnip grower

Picture 093Reynolds parsnips, along with top quality carrots are grown by R&RW Bartlett a fifth generation family owned business, located near Lichfield, Staffordshire.

History

A root vegetable native to Britain, parsnips have been cultivated by humans for at least 2,000 years and were particularly enjoyed by the Romans. Since frost is necessary to develop their flavour, the parsnip is not grown in warm climates; like carrots, they are native to Eurasia.

A young, smaller parsnip will have a distinctive sweet flavour, while large ones can sometimes be fibrous and woody.  The root vegetable should be firm in texture with an unblemished skin, and provides a good source of vitamin C, fibre, folate and potassium.

Parnsips in the kitchen

In Italy, pigs bred for top quality Parma ham are often fed on a diet of parsnips.   While they can be eaten raw, parsnips are more commonly served cooked.   Slow-roasted parsnips develop a  deliciously nutty flavour, though they can  also be used to add flavour to mashed  potatoes and are commonly added to  soups, stews and casseroles; when puréed, the parsnip works particularly well with white fish.  Before sugar was widely available, the popular vegetable was used to sweeten dishes such as cakes and jams.  Although the parsnip may have become less associated with desserts in recent times, why not create that wow factor by adding them to muffins and cakes such as our parsnip  and pecan cupcakes? They can even be used to flavour ice cream!

Try these unusual parsnip and pecan cupcakes.

Parsnip and pecan cupcakes

 

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